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23 June 2008 @ 10:10 am
Ethics/results noodling  
Got a hypothetical question for you, oh my gentles.

Say you knew from experience that you could have anything, quite literally any possible thing you asked for, simply for the asking. You know for absolutely certain that you will receive exactly, word for word, the results for which you ask. If you want to think of it as a magic wish, go ahead.

Anything possible under the sun, just by asking. Any result. You want a job? A specific one? One currently held by someone else? You want a car? You want money? You want a LOT of money? For any reason at all, selfish or not? You want someone's love? A specific person? You want someone dead? Today? Ask. It shall be yours.

Now, here's the twist: once you have what you have asked for, it will go wrong from there. I don't mean that the shine wears off or that your desire dulls. I mean that the situation will spoil, will utterly decay out from under you and become horrid. You could always ask for another wish to rectify things, yes... but then, that will decay, too. Someone pays for the ride. Someone always pays for the ride. It isn't always you... but someone pays.

Can you think of anything that would be worth it? Why, or why not? You know that the dark turn of events is due to your method, so does guilt enter into it for you? What if you're the one who pays, does that make it easier or change your mind?
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Current Mood: curious
Current Music: Ozzy Osbourne - Demon Alcohol
 
 
ravenskye8ravenskye8 on June 23rd, 2008 04:07 pm (UTC)
I tend to define a wish as being catch-free... they're wishes - the whole point of having something magically granted to you is so that you avoid the pain...

Otherwise - it's just what happens in life... Choices have consequences - if you get the job, then others did not... If you have the money, then there are others without it... You don't ever get something for nothing - even that which looks like it is "free" has come at a price - if nothing else, damned hard work...

I think you can experience great joy without the immediate juxtaposition of great pain/sorrow... but you've probably had a time of great pain/sorrow in order for you to recognize and appreciate that this moment is its opposite...