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23 June 2008 @ 10:10 am
Ethics/results noodling  
Got a hypothetical question for you, oh my gentles.

Say you knew from experience that you could have anything, quite literally any possible thing you asked for, simply for the asking. You know for absolutely certain that you will receive exactly, word for word, the results for which you ask. If you want to think of it as a magic wish, go ahead.

Anything possible under the sun, just by asking. Any result. You want a job? A specific one? One currently held by someone else? You want a car? You want money? You want a LOT of money? For any reason at all, selfish or not? You want someone's love? A specific person? You want someone dead? Today? Ask. It shall be yours.

Now, here's the twist: once you have what you have asked for, it will go wrong from there. I don't mean that the shine wears off or that your desire dulls. I mean that the situation will spoil, will utterly decay out from under you and become horrid. You could always ask for another wish to rectify things, yes... but then, that will decay, too. Someone pays for the ride. Someone always pays for the ride. It isn't always you... but someone pays.

Can you think of anything that would be worth it? Why, or why not? You know that the dark turn of events is due to your method, so does guilt enter into it for you? What if you're the one who pays, does that make it easier or change your mind?
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Current Mood: curious
Current Music: Ozzy Osbourne - Demon Alcohol
 
 
Benjamin Leelbuckley on June 23rd, 2008 03:44 pm (UTC)
True, it doesn't have to decay most horrifically. If you *knew* your wish for a job would decay horrifically -- well, I don't know if it would be worth it or not. A year from now, would you be better off if you had taken it or not? Given that either way you'd suffer -- I guess what you're asking is, is it worth experiencing great joy or contentment in exchange for great suffering (as opposed to, say, experiencing mediocre joy and mediocre suffering?). In many cases, it's worth it, I'd say. I suffered in many ways living in Egypt for three years, and I'd never live there again -- but neither would I go back and choose differently.

Interesting questions. What do you think, would the job wish be worth it or not?
Traveler Farlandertwfarlan on June 23rd, 2008 03:50 pm (UTC)
Hypothetically, let's say it wasn't, no. Hypothetically, gettings things just like they were desired to be resulted over time in having to suck it up and take just the opposite, a position where the conditions were exactly opposite of anything desired. Hypothetically, the job so desired turned sour, where nothing could be done correctly no matter what, and the question was less of if to leave and more whether to leave before being fired.

Hypothetically.
Benjamin Leelbuckley on June 23rd, 2008 03:56 pm (UTC)
The good thing about jobs is you can quit them and move on, when they begin to decay horrifically. Cut your losses, so to speak. Unless you've made a hypothetical deal with the devil in which you MUST see the decay out to its bitter end.